Rayland Baxter

Heartland Credit Union Presents

Rayland Baxter

Liz Cooper & The Stampede, Bedouine

Fri · January 19, 2018

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$15

This event is all ages

Majestic Theatre | 115 King St

Rayland Baxter
Rayland Baxter
Rayland Baxter’s anticipated new full-length album, Imaginary Man, is out now on ATO Records (iTunes). In celebration of the release, Entertainment Weekly recently premiered a new in-studio session video of Baxter performing the album’s first single, “Yellow Eyes.” Of Baxter and the song, Entertainment Weekly praises, “…a standout song on an album full of excellent writing and careful melodies. The track balances warm acoustics, and side-eyed, self-deprecating lyrics.” The video can now be viewed/shared here. Additionally, Baxter’s recent interview onNPR’s “Weekend Edition Saturday” with host Linda Wertheimer can be heard here.

Released to widespread critical attention, Stereogum proclaims, “…this record is choose-your-own-adventure indie-country-bliss…On Imaginary Man Baxter proves that Nashville sensibilities can work like a prism: filtering indie, pop, outlaw and gospel into the musical ethos of a single man. One thing’s for sure, he’s got a hell of an imagination,” while The New York Times praises, “Nashville may be the capital of country music, but it’s also seen its share of top rock acts, including Jack White’s Raconteurs, Kings of Leon and Paramore. Rayland Baxter sits between those two worlds, as evidenced on his second full-length release…On this album, Rayland builds melodies with lush guitars, keyboards and harmonies far closer to the Shins than Blake Shelton.” Moreover, of “Yellow Eyes,” NPR Music’s Ann Powers asserts, “Many musicians can craft about one-third of an excellent pop song. Some write beautiful bare melodies that drip into your head like honey into cake. Others are masters of tone, using genius arrangements and technical wizardry to craft a sound that transports, no matter the shape of the tune. Still others employ wit to craft characters that feel like friends. Rarely, a musician manages to do all three. On the new ‘Yellow Eyes,’ Rayland Baxter comes pretty darn close to such perfection,” while GQ calls the album track “Young Man,” “The Best Song From Fashion Week.”

Recorded in Nashville, the 11-track album was produced by Adam Landry (Deer Tick, Diamond Rugs) and Eric Masse (Andrew Combs, Robert Ellis) and features Bucky Baxter (Bob Dylan, Ryan Adams) on pedal steel as well as Jessie Baylin, Isaaca Byrd (MYZICA), Mikky Ekko, Jordan Lehning (Caitlin Rose, Steelism) and Matt Vazquez (Delta Sprit) on background vocals.

Of the album, Baxter comments, “To me, Imaginary Man is an audible record of my journey down the bright blue river of imagination. It is a multicolored dream of song, a sonic birdbath if you may. The sounds and songs are as visual as they are tactile and it shows a bit more of who I have become as an artist, as continual and never ending as that process is.”

Imaginary Man follows Baxter’s highly praised debut feathers & fishHooks, which was released in 2012. Since then, Baxter has toured alongside Grace Potter and the Nocturnals, Kacey Musgraves, The Head and the Heart, Shakey Graves, Boz Scaggs and Tedeschi Trucks Band, among many others.
Liz Cooper & The Stampede
Liz Cooper & The Stampede
"It started with golf clubs and country clubs, but now it's all rock clubs," Liz says, giggling. She spent the majority of her life developing her golf skills, only to drop her college scholarship to move to Nashville and pursue music. "Writing songs and playing the guitar came as naturally to me as golf did. But music tickled my brain in a way nothing else ever could."

But, Liz didn't know a soul in Nashville when she moved. So, she went and got a job at a familiar place: a country club. "Liz may not have known anyone when she moved here," says the Stampede low-end provider Grant. "But now, I feel like she knows pretty much every person she walks past. She just doesn't stop smiling, and people don't stop smiling back." Coincidentally -- or not so coincidentally cuz, well, Nashville -- some fellow co-workers at the country club also had a band. They called themselves Future Thieves, and they offered to record Liz's first EP, Monsters. After that, Liz began writing songs as frequently as she smiles. She formed a band with Ky Baker on drums and Grant Prettyman on the weird long guitar, and they recorded the Live at the Silent Planet EP. And now, there's enough new songs to record a full-length album. "The record we're working on now is a combination of Liz's darkly-lit, reclusive songwriting habits, and Grant and I's Rolling Rock induced rock and roll" chimes Ky. "It's about bringing our different styles together to create something that makes us all question what kind of music we even like anyways."
Bedouine
Bedouine
Like her name implies, Bedouine's music has a nomadic heart. Sweeping, hypnotic. Esoteric yet familiar. It is untethered to place because its home is everywhere.

Bedouine's sound is for the modern cyber gypsy, dipping a curious toe in the swaying Mediterranean before caravaning for weeks across the deserts of the Middle East, and finally catching a redeye back to L.A. for a pre-dawn Southern California stroll.

"It's in my roots," Bedouine says over a tenuous Skype connection from Saudi Arabia. "I love exploring different places and sounds. My childhood was this amalgamation of different cultures, so I've never really belonged to a particular place. But being nomadic can be a beautiful thing if you're accepting of it -- not knowing exactly what you're doing or where you're going, but with conviction. Being experimental, even with your intentions."

An outsider and an introvert, Bedouine prefers anonymity but loves making music enough to share hers with anyone willing to listen -- even if it means confronting her fears. An aversion to the spotlight led her away from the stage for several years, where she worked from the shadows, composing music for independent films and art installations until something unexpected happened -- she wound up in Los Angeles and experienced the opposite of the cliché.

"The joy I get from making music has nothing to do with any kind of recognition," Bedouine says, "so when I moved to L.A., I had no intention of pursuing music as a career. But then I started meeting so many inspiring people -- talented musicians who were living these double lives, going out on the road with successful bands and playing stadiums, and then coming home to this amazing scene and playing all these great little clubs and bars. It made the idea of starting over with my music less intimidating, and it made me more comfortable with the idea of performing. L.A. actually made me less jaded."

She soon fell in with the tight-knit community of performers in her Echo Park neighborhood, spending nights trading songs and listening to records with some of L.A.'s best underground artists. "One of my favorite ways to hang out with people," Bedouine says, "is to take turns listening to each other's music, bouncing ideas back and forth."

It was on just such a night that she met collaborator Jake Blanton (The Killers, Father John Misty, Jenny O.), with whom she would record the songs for her new self-titled EP.

The two co-wrote "The City," and put together a short yet memorable set of songs propelled by insistent, mesmerizing beats, and anchored by chiming guitar, daydreamy piano and above all, Bedouine's unforgettable voice. Impressionistic, her languid vocals swirl into the ether, another color in the palette, another instrument in the band. Her words roll soft off the tongue, careful brushstrokes, oil paint swept across a canvas. The music is beautiful and striking, always revelling quietly in its search for some enigmatic unknown just out of reach. There is no ego here, no filter between Bedouine's heart and her songs.
Venue Information:
Majestic Theatre
115 King Street
Madison, WI, 53703
http://www.majesticmadison.com/